Breaking from Taylorism
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Breaking from Taylorism changing forms of work in the automobile industry by JuМ€rgens, Ulrich.

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Published by Cambridge University Press in Cambridge .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Automobile industry and trade -- Case studies.,
  • Trade-unions -- Automobile industry and trade -- Case studies.,
  • Industrial relations -- Case studies.

Book details:

Edition Notes

StatementUlrich Jürgens, Thomas Malsch and Knuth Dohse.
ContributionsMalsch, Thomas., Dohse, Knuth.
The Physical Object
Paginationxix, 442p. :
Number of Pages442
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL21502796M
ISBN 100521405440

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Breaking from Taylorism: Changing Forms of Work in the Automobile Industry 1st Edition(Paperback) by Jü, Ulrich; rgens; Malsch, Thomas; Dohse, Knuth published by Cambridge University Press on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. Breaking from Taylorism: Changing Forms of Work in the Automobile Industry Ulrich Jurgens, Thomas Malsch, Knuth Dohse The future of one of the world's most important industries is examined from the perspective of work structures and labor relations policies. Buy Breaking from Taylorism by Ulrich Jurgens, Thomas Malsch, Knuth Dohse online at Alibris. We have new and used copies available, in 1 editions - starting at $ Shop now. In this book, the future of one of the world's most important industries is examined from the perspective of work structures and labour relations policies. The authors examine the restructuring of the world automobile industry in the s, and draw data from an in-depth empirical study of three leading car companies in three different countries: the United States, the United Kingdom and Germany.

Buy Breaking from Taylorism: Changing Forms of Work in the Automobile Industry by Ulrich Jürgens, Thomas Malsch, Knuth Dohse (ISBN: ) from Amazon's Book Store. Everyday low prices and free delivery on eligible : Knuth Dohse Ulrich Jürgens, Thomas Malsch. Taylorism Transformed and millions of other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device by:   In the latest issue of Jacobin, Shawn Gude argues that the neoliberal education reform movement, in pushing for standardized testing, privatizations, and union breaking, represents a top-down attempt to implement the industrial techniques of Taylorism in the modern classroom. Standardized testing, score-based individual compensation, and the “dumbing down and narrowing of curricula” are. Breaking from Taylorism: changing forms of work in the automobile industry. [Ulrich Jürgens; Thomas Malsch; Knuth Dohse] -- In this book, the future of one of the world's most important industries is examined from the perspective of work structures and labor relations policies.

Scientific management is a theory of management that analyzes and synthesizes workflows. Its main objective is improving economic efficiency, especially labor productivity. It was one of the earliest attempts to apply science to the engineering of processes to management. Scientific management is sometimes known as Taylorism after its founder, Frederick Winslow Taylor. Taylor began the theory's . One hundred years ago, the pu blication of a small book set off an inter national restorm. New Y ork) that catapulted Frederick Taylor to international fame. Frederick Taylor was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania on Ma Frederick Wilson Taylor’s Scientific Management Theory Dr. Roopinder Oberoi Assistant Professor of Political Science Kirori Mall College, University of Delhi Scientific management also called Taylorism is a theory of management that analyzes and synthesizes workflows, improving labour productivity. The core ideas of the theory wereFile Size: KB. Lean machines. Breaking from Taylorism: For most of this century, the chaos in automobile assembly was controlled by breaking complex tasks into a succession of elementary and repetitive ones, organised such that even unskilled labour could cope.